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There was a second ship out in the storm called the Fearless, and they all perished so that the folks on the Minnow could make it to shore.

It makes sense lyrically, and it's a lot more believable than the notion that Gilligan (the entire "crew") is capable of saving people's lives.
yendi: (Default)
(Scene: Preparing to go out):

Shira (looking at me): What?

Me: You're cute.

Shira: No, you're cute. Your face is cute.

Me: Nuh-uh. If I'm so cute, why don't you marry me?

Shira (sighing): Because I already did that, Adam. Catch up. You're like fourteen seasons behind.

Me: I can binge it.
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Amazon's got its annual Prime Day going on now (with deals only for Prime members, although I suspect most folks using Amazon regularly fit the bill), and for the most part, it's better than in previous years, but not the national holiday they want it to be. That said, a lot of the hot deals went right away, and there's a ton of stuff to sort through and some hella bad site design, and I can't pretend to be as excited about most of the options as I'd like (but do look in any category that might appeal to you, as there really is stuff site-wide).

A few key pieces of wheat amongst the chaff:

The big one is getting $5 off $15 worth of books using the PRIMEBOOKS17 code. Since that stacks with any Prime Day book deals already, it's really solid. Good deals at the second link include a bunch of Scalzi, lots of YA and cooking options, and a bunch of the Dummies series.

The Echo Dot is down to $34.99 ($15 off).

The 8-quart Instant Pot is down to $89.99, making it $10 cheaper than the 6-quart model that I have, and the Crock-Pot 6-Quart Programmable Cook & Carry Slow Cooker is $31.99 (47% off and about $30 below other deals).

I've never gotten the appeal of Dash Buttons, but at $.99 a pop (with a $4.99 credit after you place your first order), that's a solid deal.

And finally, if you buy a $25 Amazon Gift Card (even one for yourself), you can snag a $5 Promotional Credit. That's basically free money if you're going to keep buying stuff on Amazon. Note that the promo credit (unlike the gift card) expires at the end of August.
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Relevant to everyone's needs (whether you're reading this on DW and are an ex-LJ person or someone who's using a service that has its roots in LJ, or on LJ itself, in which case I fully expect Putin and the Putinesca Censorship Troupe to gank this post or make it invisible), the latest episode of Reply All -- one of the better podcasts out there overall -- is about LiveJournal's history and sale to Russia. Of course, it does leave out the fact that the company that sold them off to Russia was Six Apart (while still under the auspices of Certified Internet Hero Anil Dash), but it's still a good listen and gives a lot of perspective on things from the POV of Russians who were using the service in the last decade.
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We got home around 1. When I came upstairs this morning before 8, I found that a couple of cookbooks had been knocked off the kitchen bookshelf. No big deal. Then I noticed that the sample pack of cat food we'd gotten in the mail (Rachel Ray's Delish) was in the dining room and torn open. Sigh. I cleaned it up, went about the rest of the morning routine, and then hit the living room, where the bag of soft duck and pumpkin dog treats was lying there, also torn open.

Sigh.

Normally when there's morning chaos, I know which animal to blame (and this generally seems like Charlotte-style mischief), but I'm not sure all the animals didn't work together. Thankfully, it doesn't look like they ate a ton of the food in either case (I'm not sure Nicky even realized his treats had been opened).

Remember, folks: Having pets is good for your emotional health!
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Watching the Jeopardy! Teacher's Tournament from last month, there was this clue about William Henry Harrison: What he said in his inaugural: 'We admit of no govt. by divine right"; what he should have said: "I need a heavier coat!"

I swear to fucking god, WHH dying because he caught a cold while speaking is up there with "90% of your body heat leaves through your head, hands, and feet" the dumbest urban legend that smart people still parrot. But Jeopardy! supposedly has paid fact checkers who should catch this stuff.
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So after seeing the list of Eisner nominations, I grabbed a bunch of them from the library. I do this with a lot of nomination lists, and it usually leads to some good reads, like Viet Thanh Nguyen's The Sympathizer: A Novel (which I read when it was shortlisted for an Edgar, before it had won either that award or the slightly more famous award it pulled in later). I'll occasionally find a book I bounce off of, but rarely one I actively dislike.

"Rarely," of course, doesn't mean "never."

For some reason, in the "Best New Series" category, mixed in with Simone's Clean Room (which is fantastic and often disturbing in the best possible way), Houser's Faith (which is a blast), and Cain's Mockingbird (which is a must-read if you were a fan of '80s West Coast Avengers or of Fraction's Hawkeye run), is Christopher Priest's Deathstroke: Rebirth.

This book is the offspring of a hot mess and a flaming bag of dogshit, people.

First, let's start with the obvious problem. Deathstroke/Slade makes a terrible lead character. DC's been trying to make him work as a lead since the early '90s, and it's failed so miserably he might as well be named "Fetch." It's not surprising. He's a great supporting character, but by his very nature, is one who can't sustain a book. He's a villain (albeit one with some familial ties to super heroes), for starters. There are plenty of folks who are antiheroes, or morally-challenged, who sustain books (Punisher, Deadpool, John Constantine, Catwoman, etc), but they almost all have to be drawn somewhat back over the line from true villainy to make them work. The occasionally team book like Secret Six or Suicide Squad lets villains work as a group, but for the most part, villains work best as supporting characters, with the occasional focus issue to humanize them. Whenever DC tries to make Deathstroke a lead, it forces the character to be softened, or for us to root for someone we can't realistically engage with. And in the end, there's very little story to tell around his actual villainy, meaning we're stuck time and again with stories about his family (most of whom are also awful characters not meant to get much screen time).

That's the core of the problem, and while Christopher Priest has done some great stuff in the past (I like his Black Panther run a lot more than the current one by Ta-Nahisi Coates, for example), he falls into the trap here. We get Deathstroke's origin for the zillionth time, drawn out over multiple issues, complete with all the usual beats -- his son nearly getting killed, his long-lost daughter from an affair, etc -- but minus the verve with which Marv Wolfman first told it in the '80s. We get a bunch of standard fights and combat missions (including the most ridiculous and ludicrous opening issue, in which there's are multiple sets of supposedly predictable betrayals by an African warlord, a D-list Batman villain (Clock King), and Slade himself that are somehow designed to get Slade to trade out his outfit for a different one at the cost of dozens of lives in an act of manipulation that nonsensical even by comic standards). We get silly super-hero battles that rely on both Deathstroke and Batman having so many layered plans-within-plans that it reads like Vizzini going on his poison-detecting rant in Princess Bride.

There's also the supporting cast, which here consists of Wintergreen (Slade's ever-loyal companion, a former British SAS agent who now, as in most previous incarnations, seems to exist mainly as a combination manservant/sidekick with little agency of his own); a hacker whose name I've already forgotten but who is the generic Remote Hacker archetype who can do anything*; and Rose (AKA Ravager, the aforementioned daughter from Slade's affair with a Hmong woman -- to the book's credit, the racial erasure that was performed on the character in New 52 has been undone here, although there are a few problematic things involving the origin here).

And Rose, dear god, is so much of the problem here. See, she's working as a bouncer in a strip club -- a bouncer and not a dancer, of course, because she should be a sexy character but that would be going too far (ETA: Per textual reading, not my own opinion, of course). But also, she tells her dad (who she hasn't seen in years and who, incidentally, she caught spying on her as she woke up that morning, which is CREEPY AS FUCK), she's not actually having sex with her live-in boyfriend with whom she sleeps. See, they literally just live and sleep together, because it's about "owning" her sexuality. Which, you know, could be a thing in the right circumstances (I mean, if they'd pitched this as her being asexual but romantic, sure), but everything about their relationship (including their flirting by text) is that of a sexually active couple, but more fucking importantly, WHY THE FUCK WOULD SHE TELL HER DAD THIS ANYWAY? Her estranged dad, but it wouldn't be his business if they were having dinner nightly.

Oh, but it gets worse, because Slade then casually comments that she's "blue-balling" her boyfriend. OH JOHN RINGO CHRISTOPHER PRIEST NO.

Seriously. I have no idea of Priest has any kids, but actually, yeah, I'm pretty sure he doesn't, nor has he ever seen parents interacting with their adult female children.

Oh, and as a little lagniappe (although one that comes before that scene), when Wintergreen and Rose see each other, the former tells her that he's "had a crush on you since I first met you." They first met when Rose was 11 and Wintergreen was in his late-forties or so (and also right after she shot and crippled one of Slade and Wintergreen's buddies). Welp.

Anyway, the book sucks, both because of how fucking creepy it is, and because it's mediocre even without the creepy factor. It's literally the only bad choice in its category this year, which means it'll probably win because the world sucks.

*In fact, if any single fucking trope needs to die a fiery death, it's the Magic Hacker. At this point, there are roughly four zillion people in the DCU who are on a par with Oracle at her prime, and the use of Magic Hacking is just some of the laziest shit imaginable. This is more than a DCU problem, of course, but it really has to fucking stop.
yendi: (Default)
So overall, that was disappointing.

The bad:

1. By having the first three songs be covers (and with cast including Gustin, Benoist, and Criss), a good part of this really felt like an AU Glee Episode. That's not a good thing, ever.

2. The pacing was terrible. This was probably in an attempt to give everyone their shot at singing, but they could have made things more dense (see the Buffy musical, or Galavant), or paced it over both shows instead of just cramming it into Flash*. We wasted too much time in the "real world," and not enough in the musical one.

3. Any show whose end goal is to have Kara/Mon-El get back together has bad goals. And it would have been ten times more dramatically interesting to only have Barry/Iris back together at the end.

4. No one loves meta stuff more than me, but it's played out, and for every joke that landed, there was another one that hurt the pacing.

5. The final song, "Runnin' Home To You," was so generic, it might as well not have existed (and Google tells me it's from the people who just won the Best Song Oscar, which only quintuples my lack of interest in La La Land).

6. The Music Meister is, at heart, a surreal or absurdist villain, like Mister Mxyzptlk, Bat-Mite, or The Impossible Man. He was, frankly, way too grounded here, as was the internally-logical dream world. This was a lost opportunity.

The good:

1. "More I Cannot Wish You" has been the momentum killer in every production of Guys and Dolls I've ever seen, but put in the hands of Garber, Martin, and Barrowman, it worked really well.

2. "Superfriends" was cute, and the right kind of song to show of the adorableness of the two stars.

3. While the entire Barry/Iris breakup plotline has been silly, at least it's over with for now.

4. All of the actual singing performances, even when of unnecessary songs, were well done (OTOH, note how much better the Buffy musical was even with a lead whose singing was par, at best; maybe that's not the best reason to do a musical episode?).

*I'm assuming there's a Kyle/Wally story with the title "Cramming it into Flash" somewhere.
yendi: (Default)
So overall, that was disappointing.

The bad:

1. By having the first three songs be covers (and with cast including Gustin, Benoist, and Criss), a good part of this really felt like an AU Glee Episode. That's not a good thing, ever.

2. The pacing was terrible. This was probably in an attempt to give everyone their shot at singing, but they could have made things more dense (see the Buffy musical, or Galavant), or paced it over both shows instead of just cramming it into Flash*. We wasted too much time in the "real world," and not enough in the musical one.

3. Any show whose end goal is to have Kara/Mon-El get back together has bad goals. And it would have been ten times more dramatically interesting to only have Barry/Iris back together at the end.

4. No one loves meta stuff more than me, but it's played out, and for every joke that landed, there was another one that hurt the pacing.

5. The final song, "Runnin' Home To You," was so generic, it might as well not have existed (and Google tells me it's from the people who just won the Best Song Oscar, which only quintuples my lack of interest in La La Land).

6. The Music Meister is, at heart, a surreal or absurdist villain, like Mister Mxyzptlk, Bat-Mite, or The Impossible Man. He was, frankly, way too grounded here, as was the internally-logical dream world. This was a lost opportunity.

The good:

1. "More I Cannot Wish You" has been the momentum killer in every production of Guys and Dolls I've ever seen, but put in the hands of Garber, Martin, and Barrowman, it worked really well.

2. "Superfriends" was cute, and the right kind of song to show of the adorableness of the two stars.

3. While the entire Barry/Iris breakup plotline has been silly, at least it's over with for now.

4. All of the actual singing performances, even when of unnecessary songs, were well done (OTOH, note how much better the Buffy musical was even with a lead whose singing was par, at best; maybe that's not the best reason to do a musical episode?).

*I'm assuming there's a Kyle/Wally story with the title "Cramming it into Flash" somewhere.

D'oh

Mar. 13th, 2017 02:41 pm
yendi: (Default)
For the first time in a few years, took a dive into my LJ account to see what accounts I hadn't friended back, and clearly missed a bunch of legit requests amidst the spam. I've friended a bunch of folks I know back, although for accounts that don't seem to have been updated in over a decade, I'm assuming those are abandoned (although I realize some folks don't post, but still use LJ to read and comment). But if I missed you and you're a real active LJ person and not a spambot, let me know (since LJ userinfo pages can be incredibly vague for identifying people). At least a few of these were accounts I'd assumed I had already friended, and since there were nearly 200 accounts I hadn't friended back, I'm sure I've overlooked some.

(Not crossposting to DW, since I'm actually caught up there.)
yendi: (Default)
Amazon's got a one-day sale offering $8.62 off any $50 order (celebrating a Harris Poll ranking). Only available for another six hours, so grab it while you can.
yendi: (Default)
Amazon's got a one-day sale offering $8.62 off any $50 order (celebrating a Harris Poll ranking). Only available for another six hours, so grab it while you can.
yendi: (Default)
Okay, folks, I'll go ahead and try to crowdsource this, since I'm not finding answers any other way.

As anyone who's gotten emails from me recently knows, Gmail has decided to double-send every email I send. Actually, it both double-sends it (so you'll get two copies), and gives me an error message saying it couldn't be sent (thus leaving both two sent copies and a draft in my mailbox). The actual error message reads: "Oops... a server error occurred and your email was not sent. (#78282)"

In an ironic twist, Google is useless for finding what that error means.

This happens on every web browser version of gmail on every computer, including Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and even IE on a Windows laptop I used at Arisia. It does not happen on the gmail app for my iPad or my Windows Phone or on Thunderbird (but dammit, I like using the gmail interface).

Other data: The only Lab I have active is the Calendar widget. No apps authorized other than the ones like the iPad app that need it. Changing themes does nothing. None of the options I found searching (most of which involve browser cache) work, not surprisingly (since it's obviously not my browser).

Oh, and my work gmail is configured exactly the same way as my personal one, and it doesn't have any problems even on the same browsers.

Anyone have any thoughts/experience with this?
yendi: (Default)
Okay, folks, I'll go ahead and try to crowdsource this, since I'm not finding answers any other way.

As anyone who's gotten emails from me recently knows, Gmail has decided to double-send every email I send. Actually, it both double-sends it (so you'll get two copies), and gives me an error message saying it couldn't be sent (thus leaving both two sent copies and a draft in my mailbox). The actual error message reads: "Oops... a server error occurred and your email was not sent. (#78282)"

In an ironic twist, Google is useless for finding what that error means.

This happens on every web browser version of gmail on every computer, including Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and even IE on a Windows laptop I used at Arisia. It does not happen on the gmail app for my iPad or my Windows Phone or on Thunderbird (but dammit, I like using the gmail interface).

Other data: The only Lab I have active is the Calendar widget. No apps authorized other than the ones like the iPad app that need it. Changing themes does nothing. None of the options I found searching (most of which involve browser cache) work, not surprisingly (since it's obviously not my browser).

Oh, and my work gmail is configured exactly the same way as my personal one, and it doesn't have any problems even on the same browsers.

Anyone have any thoughts/experience with this?
yendi: (Default)
One of Amazon's Daily Deals is on sub-$5 Magazine subscriptions. And one of those is Teen Vogue, which has somehow become the source of some of the best anti-Trump reporting out there, for $4. There are lots of other good deals (New Yorker, Bon Appétit, Wired, GQ, etc), but that's the big one. Note that for magazines that include print/digital choices, only Woman's Health includes the all-access pass (the others are print-only). The subscriptions range from a few months to a year in length.
yendi: (Default)
One of Amazon's Daily Deals is on sub-$5 Magazine subscriptions. And one of those is Teen Vogue, which has somehow become the source of some of the best anti-Trump reporting out there, for $4. There are lots of other good deals (New Yorker, Bon Appétit, Wired, GQ, etc), but that's the big one. Note that for magazines that include print/digital choices, only Woman's Health includes the all-access pass (the others are print-only). The subscriptions range from a few months to a year in length.

Arisia!

Jan. 11th, 2017 07:20 am
yendi: (Default)
Oh, hey, since it's coming up in two days, I should probably post my Arisia schedule, right?
I'm on three panels this year, because being an ADH, shockingly, takes up a huge amount of time. So when I'm not on a panel, figure I'll be in the Green Room, The Gaming Room, or Program Nexus.
As for my panels:
Friday at 8:30, (Marina 4): Archie Comics (moderating)
Saturday at 5:30 (Douglas): Curmudgeon Panel 3: Season of the Curmudgeon!
Sunday at 8:30, (Adams): The Wicked + The Divine

Arisia!

Jan. 11th, 2017 07:20 am
yendi: (Default)
Oh, hey, since it's coming up in two days, I should probably post my Arisia schedule, right?
I'm on three panels this year, because being an ADH, shockingly, takes up a huge amount of time. So when I'm not on a panel, figure I'll be in the Green Room, The Gaming Room, or Program Nexus.
As for my panels:
Friday at 8:30, (Marina 4): Archie Comics (moderating)
Saturday at 5:30 (Douglas): Curmudgeon Panel 3: Season of the Curmudgeon!
Sunday at 8:30, (Adams): The Wicked + The Divine
yendi: (Default)
I've been crossposting to LJ and DW for years, and have no intention of stopping. But it does seem that a bunch of people are fully abandoning LJ for DW, which likely means I'll be doing more reading of my DW friends page (instead of my current model of going directly to the four DW-only pages I knew of and reading them; that doesn't scale well). So if you're someone who's reading me on DW, and I haven't friended you back? Leave me a comment to let me know. And if you're reading this on LJ and are moving over to DW, feel free to add me there as "yendi" and I'll add you back (I think I'm up-to-date and will continue to be so on new folks there).
yendi: (Default)
I've been crossposting to LJ and DW for years, and have no intention of stopping. But it does seem that a bunch of people are fully abandoning LJ for DW, which likely means I'll be doing more reading of my DW friends page (instead of my current model of going directly to the four DW-only pages I knew of and reading them; that doesn't scale well). So if you're someone who's reading me on DW, and I haven't friended you back? Leave me a comment to let me know. And if you're reading this on LJ and are moving over to DW, feel free to add me there as "yendi" and I'll add you back (I think I'm up-to-date and will continue to be so on new folks there).

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